Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Book Watch: MY FATHER'S VOICE by Janice Elizabeth Duval #BookWatch




MY FATHER'S VOICE
Janice Elizabeth Duval
Devotional

Many years ago when I became a Christian, I was like many people who did not really know God as he is-a loving and gracious father. When my family and I moved to Kansas and then to Oklahoma, it was right in the midst of the Charismatic Renewal. It was at the point in my life I began to see God in a totally different way. I did not realize that he loved me, Jan Duval. I certainly did not know that he wanted to talk to me personally! As I studied the scriptures and learned more and more about Jesus and his relationship with his father and understood that the Father wanted a similar relationship with me, I was over the moon! Each morning, I could hardly wait for my family to leave for the day so that I could have my time of fellowship with God. It was during these times that I began to write the things I felt God was telling me. I love how tenderly and patiently Father God teaches profound, amusing, and down-to-earth life lessons from everyday events. God is amazing! I hope these writings will encourage, inspire, and add some humor to the reader.

PRAISE AND ACCOLADES:

“Every person I know is in need of encouragement. The problem is that our daily grind and the routine of life sometimes rob us of this precious commodity. Janice Duval has done us all a service by compiling her short stories, antidotes, and heart conversations with God.  I think you will be amazed at how God uses understandable stories to make a profound and lasting imprint on your heart.  No doubt, the encouragement that you receive from this book will cause you to share it with others.”
Bishop Michael Pitts, Bestselling Author

HIGGINS PUBLISHING https://smarturl.it/mfv






I still stood dumbfounded as she began to attempt to behead this big white bird in the same manner; she had witnessed both Mr. Thomas and Ralph do in the past.  She tried to wring the bird’s neck by whirling him around and around and then snap ... the head was supposed to come off! But it didn’t!  The bird was staggering around, with its head cocked to one side, looking desperately for a way of escape.  She grabbed it the second time and began her whirling thing again, when Mr. Thomas came running, yelling, “Ruthie, Ruthie, no, that is Ralph’s prize rooster!” Oops! The rescued rooster staggered away, wandering in semicircles, wondering just what had happened!








 

Janice Elizabeth Duval (Jan) is a wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Her father changed careers and joined the Army when she was 2 years old, and so she was raised in a military environment.  She met her husband, Aaron, also a military man, at Fort Knox, KY and their marriage allowed her to travel to several countries, which broadened her life experiences. She and her husband of 58 years have a total of seven children, six sons, and one daughter. Growing up as an only child, and an Army Brat, Jan learned early on to be content without having a large group of people around her. She entertained herself with books, listening to the radio and making up plays for her parents. In High School, she excelled in History and Literature and Drama.






Monday, September 14, 2020

Book Watch: Brazen in Blue by Rachael Miles #bookwatch





BRAZEN IN BLUE
Rachael Miles
Historical Romance

Lady Emmeline Hartley has overcome every obstacle life has thrown her way. A spinster, disappointed in love, Em is on the brink of a marriage of convenience, when the man who rejected her heart reappears in need of her help. It gives Em a chance to escape, put to use one of her most unusual talents–and perhaps convince him once and for all to risk his heart…

Adam Montclair–one of the most successful agents at the Home Office–rubs elbows with the highest levels of society. Even so, he wasn’t to the manor born. No matter how much he desires Em, as a match he is completely unsuitable. While it pains him to be near her, it’s a punishment he richly deserves. Now on a mission to uncover a plot against the government, Adam knows Em’s uncanny ability to recall voices will be essential. Yet as the two thwart the dangers in their path, it may become impossible to deny that Em is essential to happiness itself…

Book five in Miles’s The Muses’ Salon series (after Reckless in Red) delivers heady Regency romance featuring a refreshing heroine and a tantalizing mystery. Lady Emmeline Hartley permanently injured her legs at age six in the same accident that killed her mother and sisters. Her father abandoned her to be raised by servants, and Em has spent the intervening years caring for his estate with her faithful dog, Queen Bess, at her side. Now Em is on the brink of a marriage of convenience to longtime family friend Lord Colin Somerville—but she gets cold feet and flees on her wedding day, reluctantly accepting the aid of Adam Locksley, an agent of the Home Office and Em’s former lover, to get away. Though Em is angry at Adam over a perceived betrayal, Adam is determined to keep her safe. But in a delightful twist, the Home Office requests Em’s help to catch a burgeoning threat to England, and Adam and Em are quickly embroiled in a multitude of schemes. Em’s self-discovery is a delight to behold as she matures from impish child, to solemn bride-to-be, to fully self-actualized, independent woman working hand in hand with a partner. Series fans and new readers alike will be charmed.

— Publishers Weekly

Amazon → https://amzn.to/2XewVpd

 Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/3jHOiIs


_____________________





August 1819
The note was short. A time, a place, a handwriting she knew. But no apology.
Lady Emmeline Hartley read the note again.
I must see you. I wouldn’t ask, knowing how we parted. But I must say it: lives depend on it. Come to the great oak at midnight. The light of the moon will guide your way.
For months she’d imagined how she would respond if Adam Locksley ever sent her such a note. After long con- sideration, she’d determined she wouldn’t see him. She would let him and his rabble-rousing friends go; she would do good in her own way. She had her own funds. She didn’t need to overturn the aristocracy to feed those on her estate or in her shire.
She threw the note into the fire.
But she had no choice but to meet Adam. A week ago, Lord Colin Somerville had arrived, haggard and wounded both in body and soul. He was her childhood defender, her dear and constant friend. He’d asked for shelter and for secrecy. She’d promised him both. She wouldn’t let her indiscretions alter that.
If she didn’t meet Adam, he would come to the estate. He’d done it before, stood under her balcony with a hand- ful of pebbles and hit every window but her own. In the months since she’d seen him last, she’d moved her bedroom to another wing of the manor, so whatever window his pebbles struck, it couldn’t be hers. That made it more likely that Colin would hear him, and then she’d have to explain. The thought of her upstanding defender pacing off a duel with her criminal lover twisted her stomach.
No, she had to meet Adam. But she didn’t have to trust him.
She dressed quickly in a dark riding dress covered by her grandfather’s greatcoat, shortened to fit her height. Removing a muff pistol from her dressing table, she carefully loaded the chamber, then tucked it into an inner pocket she’d sewn for the purpose. When Em picked up her walking stick, her giant Newfoundland dog, Queen Bess, rose and joined her.
Taking a deep breath, Emmeline slipped into the hall, Bess padding quietly behind. She stole down the staircase and through the door leading into the kitchen garden. No one noticed.
At the garden, two paths led to the great oak. The smoother, wider, but more public, route took her toward the village, joining the forest where the bridge crossed the river. The longer, but more secluded, route led through the uneven ground of the churchyard. She chose the pri- vate cemetery path.
Since the moon was bright, she walked close to the chapel walls. Inside the churchyard, she passed the graves of her oldest ancestors. While she was within the view of the house, she forced herself to move slowly, stepping from the shadow of one tree to the next. If someone looked out a window, she wanted to appear no more than a trick of the moonlight, or, for the more superstitious, a ghost uneasy in the grave or one of the faerie folk come to dance among the oaks.
At the graves of her sisters, she quickened her pace. As a child, she had carried her bowl of porridge to their trim plots, believing they could know she was near them. But as she’d grown, she had set aside such fancies. Nursery rhymes and folk tales only cloud the judgment. Even so, she was grateful her sisters had been long silent: she would have hated for them to know what a fool she’d been.
Stepping into the forest, Emmeline quickened her step, but not because Adam waited. She could never make her way to the great oak’s clearing without thinking of her mother and sisters, lost in a carriage accident when Emmeline was just six. Her mother, Titania—named after Shakespeare’s Queen of the Faeries—had believed the clearing was one of the few remaining places where the human and faerie worlds overlapped. On picnics, Titania would enthrall her daughters with tales of magic and enchantment, her voice a lilting honey-gold. Sometimes Titania would sing them an eerie, tuneless song she claimed the Faerie Queen had taught her. On those days, Emmeline would dance around the great oak, believing that she could see shadowy figures melt out of and back into the trees.
Had Emmeline not grown up half in love with faeries, she wouldn’t have fallen so easily under Adam’s spell. When she’d first encountered him beneath the shadows of the giant oak, she would have known that, though he was playing a lyre, he was just another highwayman. Emme- line slowed, not wishing to tax her leg, as she navigated her way carefully across the raised tree roots that broke up the path. But even so, she reached the clearing long before the time he’d set.
He stood much as he had the first time she’d seen him. His long dark cloak was the color of shadows, and his doublet and trousers were a rich forest green. This time, however, he had no lyre, and, without his rich baritone, the clearing was oddly silent.
Even so, she wasn’t prepared for the visceral jolt of recognition when she saw him or the way she longed to feel the touch of his hands and lips. But she refused her desire. She couldn’t allow herself to trust him again.
“No song tonight?” She kept her distance, keeping her hand hidden inside her cloak.
“I feel little like singing.”
Even in the dark, her mind saw his words as texture and color.
He walked to the altar rock, gesturing for her to sit beside him as they used to do. His body appeared tense, his shoulders and neck held taut.
“What troubles you?” She leaned up against the giant oak instead. “Could you find no good and true English- men, to seduce with your words?”
“You’re still angry.” He stepped toward her.
“No, to feel angry, I’d have to feel something for you.” She held up her walking stick menacingly, and he stopped several feet away. “But you killed my good feelings when you let those men die. All that’s left is revulsion.”
“What if I told you that they weren’t dead? That they and their families are living well on their own plots of land, happy in the colonies?” He raised his hands in sup- plication.
“I’d ask what other fairy tales you wish for me to be- lieve. I saw the notice of execution. My only disappoint- ment was that your name wasn’t on it.” She knew the words weren’t true, but she wouldn’t let him see other- wise. Her life would be better without him.
“I knew this was a bad idea.” He raked his hand through his hair.
“After months of silence and last week’s massacre at Manchester, did you expect me to be grateful for your summons?”
“Then why did you come?” Adam held out his hand, but she ignored it.
“To warn you,” she said flatly.
“Of what?” He looked hopeful.
“Set foot upon my lands again or in the village or any where in this county, and I will have you hung. I will testify myself.”
“How can you testify without revealing your part in my crimes?” Adam’s tone sounded almost amused.
“I can’t. That’s your dilemma. You promised me once that you would never allow me to be harmed by riding with you. If you stay, I will have you jailed and tried, and I cannot help but be harmed if I testify.” She spoke slowly. She would not be misunderstood. “You have a choice. You may hold your meetings. Create your reform societies. Tempt the farmers and workmen to peaceful protests like the one at Peterloo, where they will be killed or maimed. But not here.”
“Em, I didn’t intend . . .” He stepped forward, but she held up the walking stick, stopping his progress.
“I don’t care what your intentions were. I thought you were a good man, that you hoped to ease the sufferings of your fellow men, that you wanted rational reform. You showed me those sufferings in ways that I’d never seen before.” She willed her voice to remain even. “But you betrayed the cottagers who believed in you, and you led them straight to their deaths. And I was beside you. Their blood is on my hands as surely as it is on yours. My only redemption will be to oppose you and men like you to my last breath.”
“I need your help.” He held out his palms in supplication, walking toward her.
“Never. I reserve my help for the families men like you destroy. Now leave my land before I set the magistrate on you.” She let her cloak fall open and lifted her hand, di- recting her pistol at his heart. “Or I will kill you myself.”
“Would you send me away if you knew it meant my death?”
She looked deep in his eyes and cocked the trigger. “Yes.”




 

Rachael Miles writes ‘cozily scrumptious’ historical romances set in the British Regency. Her books have been positively reviewed by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, and Booklist, which praised her ‘impeccably researched and beautifully crafted’ novels, comparing her works to those of Jo Beverly and Mary Jo Putney. Her novel, Reckless in Red, won first place in adult fiction: novels in the National Federation of Press Women’s writing contest. A native Texan, Miles is a former professor of book history and nineteenth-century literature. She lives in upstate New York with her indulgent husband, three rescued dogs, and all the squirrels, chipmunks, and deer who eat at her bird feeders.






Thursday, September 10, 2020

Character Q&A: Lena Frost of Rachael Miles' RECKLESS IN RED

 




Character Interview Day! Today's guest is Lena Frost from inside the pages of RECKLESS IN RED by Rachael Miles.  It is a pleasure to have her with us at The Literary Nook!




What is your name? Most people call me Lena, Lena Frost.

 

What do you look like? Ah, never ask an artist that. An artist can’t simply say ‘my hair is brown’: it’s too imprecise. No, I’d have to pick exactly the right tint: perhaps Egyptian brown (though that’s made of ground up mummies, so I’d hate to think of that in my hair!) or Cologne Earth. I’m too short to be elegant and too tall to be refined.

 

Where are you today and what are you doing? I’m an artist—and in two weeks or so, I’ll open the most important exhibition of my career: a giant panoramic painting, rising two stories tall and hung in the round. It will make my fame! But today, I’ve just come to the office I share with my business partner Horatio, and I discover that he’s disappeared with the money I need to open the exhibition. 

 

Describe the outside of your home. I don’t have a home, just places I live. For respectability’s sake, I rent a room in a wretched boarding house, whose proprietor routinely steals from the residents. Whenever I can, I stay at my studio, but it’s too close to a cemetery to be entirely safe—the fumes from the decaying bodies have been known to kill, so I have to be careful when I work there. Most of the time, I stay at the Rotunda, the building that houses the monumental history painting I’ve been working on for the past two years. 

 

You come face to face with your worse enemy. How do you react? I hide—he thinks I’m dead, and I can’t afford for him to find out otherwise.

 

You keep a photo album of memories from your lifetime. If you could only keep one photo, which one would that be? When I first met Lord Clive Somerville, I imagined him as one of the statues from the Loggia dei Lanzi come to life. I’ve drawn him in that pose a hundred times, his black hair curling in thick waves like Benvenuto Cellini’s David. It’s the one image of him I can never escape.

 

Are you a morning person or a night owl? Left to my own devices, I would sleep till noon. But I can’t sleep until the exhibition is opened, and that requires me to arrive at the Rotunda at the very rising of the sun to supervise the carpenters and other workmen. 

 

A police officer stops you for a minor violation. What violation is that and how do you react? I lead a careful life. Until the exhibition opens, I can’t afford to be noticed, and certainly not by the police. After that, I’ll have to take my chances, but for now, I keep to myself, going only from my boarding house to the Rotunda. If I see a police officer, I blend into the crowd or duck into a shop or an alley. I know a dozen ways to disappear.

 

What is your favorite piece of clothing? While I lived abroad, I adopted the wide-bottomed pants cuffed at the ankles like those you see in engravings of Turkish women’s costume. I wear them under my skirts so that I can climb the scaffolds in front of the painting or the ladder next to my observation platform without trouble.

 

Do you have any phobias? What are they and how intense are they? How have they impacted your life? I don’t like being locked in dark rooms. When I find myself alone in the dark, I keep from panicking by imagining a scene then mentally painting it in the style of a famous painter. When I’m not in a panic, I use the technique to remember a scene in meticulous detail, but it’s most useful when I’m afraid. 

 

Open your wallet, purse, or briefcase. What do you find? Horatio’s note—I really need to read that again, to see if there’s any more information I can garner about where he might be. 

 

You move into a new home. What’s the first thing you buy for it? An easel and a box of Ackermann’s pigments.

 

How do you feel about mortality? We all die. I watched as the party in power rounded up men and women who opposed them and led them to the guillotine. Life is fleeting. Do good while you can.

 

What scares you? Having to admit that I don’t have the funds to open the exhibition.

 

How would your parents describe you? My mother died when I was young, and my father rejected me soon after. But my mentor would say that I have a warm spirit and generous affections.

 

What’s the last thing you do before you go to bed at night? Lately I’m so tired by the time I reach my flat that I don’t even remember going to bed.

 

Who is your best friend? I can’t afford to have friends. I had thought Horatio was my friend, and I’m afraid to count Clive as more than an acquaintance.

 

Who is your worse enemy? Ah, I don’t speak his name. 

 

Are you faith-oriented? I believe in the resilience of the human spirit. 

 

Are you married or in a relationship? I have learned not to long for something I can’t have.

 

Do you have children? Ah, no.

 

Where is your favorite hangout? My studio.

 

You are at the zoo. What is your favorite animal? I rode an elephant once when I was a child. His skin was the most interesting texture. So, I suppose an elephant.

 

You just woke up to find that war has been declared. What’s the first thing you would do? Flee. I have known the terrors of war already, where neighbor turns all to quickly against neighbor. I would rather be a refugee than live through the destruction of my home once more.

 

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? I wanted to be able to draw like the artists I saw in the museums.

 

If there was one thing you could change about yourself, what would that be? My past. 

 
About the Book  
 



Lena Frost is a force to be reckoned with. A woman who has made her way in society without family or fortune, she’s about to realize her first big success as an artist. . . . Until her business partner makes off with her money, leaving her with little more than her hopes—and a dead body in her studio. Now Lena is at the mercy of a strikingly handsome stranger demanding answers she dare not reveal . . .

Is it her seductive eyes, or his suspicion that she’s up to no good that have Clive Somerville shadowing Lena’s every move? Either way, his secret investigation for the Home Office has him determined to uncover Lena’s hidden agenda.  But the closer he gets to her, the more he longs to be her protector. Is she a victim of circumstance? Or a dark force in a conspiracy that could destroy everything Clive holds dear?  Discovering the truth could have dire consequences, not only for Lena, but for his heart . . .

Reckless in Red was a 2019 finalist for the Holt Medallion in Historical Fiction and a first-place winner in the 2020 National Federation of Press Women’s communications contests in the category Fiction for Adult Readers: Novels.

Praise for Reckless in Red

An artist preparing a huge exhibition is disheartened when her business partner absconds with her money, but the event introduces her to an aristocrat who ultimately becomes her greatest ally against a shadowy enemy.

Artist Lena Frost is a survivor. She’s survived a weak father and a difficult stepmother. She survived in France during Napoleon’s war. She’s even rebounded from her lost career when she finally had to flee France after having been betrayed. Now she’s spent three years preparing a huge exhibition, which is the talk of London. So when her trusted business partner disappears with all her funds just two weeks before the gala opening, she’s nearly defeated. Especially when he leaves her an enigmatic message implying she’s in danger. But she can’t give up: “She would have to reinvent herself again. The very thought of it made her almost weak with despair.” Fearing she’s being followed, she winds up at The African’s Daughter, a bookshop owned by her Anglo African friend Constance Equiano, who introduces her to the Muses, a group of aristocratic ladies who meet monthly at the shop. Through them, she meets Lord Clive Somerville, brother of the Duke of Forster and the Regency equivalent of a forensic pathologist. When it becomes clear that someone is trying to kill Lena and more than one of her exhibition artists has disappeared mysteriously, Clive vows to keep her safe, help her open the exhibition, and discover who’s behind the threats. Author Miles continues her smart, intriguing Muses Salon series (Jilting the Duke, 2016, etc.) with another bright, accomplished heroine who fights for her happiness with an unexpected perfect match.

A unique storyline, a dose of suspense, and a circle of intelligent female friends enhance a successful romance.

Kirkus Reviews

The suspenseful fourth in Miles’s Muses’ Salon series (after Tempting the Earl) captivates with clever prose and an unconventional heroine. In 1820 London, painter Lena Frost drifts on the fringes of society due to her checkered past, but she hopes that her upcoming exhibition will catapult her into artistic fame. Her hopes are dashed when her business partner disappears with all of their money. Then several people, all with some connection to Lena, are murdered. Enter Clive Somerville, who is the younger brother of a duke and is a surgeon who serves among the Home Office’s investigative ranks. His inquiries into the rash of killings lead him straight to Lena’s doorstep. His fascination with Lena blurs the lines between suspicion and desire, and his urge to question her quickly transforms into a need to protect her. The only flaw in this intricately crafted historical romance is the unbelievable speed at which the connection between the protagonists develops. Readers looking for a change from Regencies will find this witty Victorian tale refreshing.

Publishers Weekly

ORDER YOUR COPY

Amazon → https://amzn.to/3ftmvby

 Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/31cAnBO



 

About the Author 



Rachael Miles writes ‘cozily scrumptious’ historical romances set in the British Regency. Her books have been positively reviewed by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, and Booklist, which praised her ‘impeccably researched and beautifully crafted’ novels, comparing her works to those of Jo Beverly and Mary Jo Putney. Her novel, Reckless in Red, won first place in adult fiction: novels in the National Federation of Press Women’s writing contest. A native Texan, Miles is a former professor of book history and nineteenth-century literature. She lives in upstate New York with her indulgent husband, three rescued dogs, and all the squirrels, chipmunks, and deer who eat at her bird feeders.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

Website: rachaelmiles.com

Twitter Address: http://www.twitter.com/rachael_miles1

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rachaelmilesauthor

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Seed of Tamaris Book Blast!





SEED OF TAMARIS
Penni Louise
Fantasy

In a treacherous world, is it safe to be powerful?

A Brother with a tainted past. A Lord seeking a legacy for his daughters. A Queen in exhile from her ancestral home. For decades, the Lords and Ladies in the land of Tamaris have known peace among their Houses, unlike the Outlanders who face death everyday outside the kingdom’s borders. But when the King, consumed by power, turns against the beloved Queen, she is forced into hiding, and plots brew among the Houses. The threads of peace begin to unravel. From a Lord’s daughters facing the subordinations of womanhood, to the outcast who flees to The Coven of Sacred Sisters for redemption, to the boy in the mines who prefers darkness and worms to the Lightlands, the lives of the people of Tamaris are unknowingly tied to their Queen’s fate. Only the Witch knows to what end their loyalty leads them. They must navigate political ambitions, social expectations, the complexities of relationship, and traitor’s plots to survive in the midst of the building war. But many will forget that the worst peril often comes from those closest to home. SEED OF TAMARIS is an epic fantasy brimming with magik, desire, and wickedness. It is Book One of the Archipelago Series, and Penni Louise’s debut novel.

Amazon → https://amzn.to/30JffUJ

 Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/30JH1Az

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Having tired Timber out in the surf, throwing the stick till her arm hurt, the two weary friends rested on a smooth rock, basking in the afternoon sun.
 “I suppose they’ll be looking for us to get dressed and into the carriage,” Solar
sighed to Timber.
In the distance, the fishing boats were beginning to come into view on the
horizon, gulls circling and diving behind them, returning to their home harbor before the
night fell. She had asked Cook once why the boats did not stay out overnight. They seemed as big as castles, and as sturdy. Cook had shaken her head.
“They used to, little one, but not anymore. It’s dangerous to be so…exposed at
night nowadays. That’s why we tuck away in houses at night; there’s no good to be found out in the open in the dark.”
Cook refused to say why but Solar knew she had to be right.
Solar thought of her sister, always ill, and indoors. She felt badly for her, never
getting any fresh air or sunshine. She shook off the thought of stuffy rooms and stuffy carriages and stretched her legs, examining them in the sunlight.
“Look, Timber, I am getting fur like you!”
How splendid, she thought, reclining in the warm sun, and drifted off to sleep.
Sometime later, Solar woke with a pain in her back, disoriented. She was
immediately overwhelmed by the gloom; it seemed to be trying to suffocate her in shadow. She could hear and feel that the tide was coming in; the water was now splashing against the rocks, the spray hitting her feet and legs.
How long have I been asleep? She peered into the dusk and saw the stars starting to emerge overhead. A long time, then.
Something was missing. The spell of the stars suddenly broken, she realized
Timber was not beside her.
“TIMBER!” she called.
She thought she heard an answering woof but couldn’t be sure over the crashing
sound of the waves.
She stood gingerly, twisting to release her muscles, and called again, “Timber!”
She was certain she heard something this time, and slowly, feeling her way, began to climb the rocks.
She called again when she reached the top but instead of the woof she was hoping for, she heard men’s voices, coming from the direction of home. A Border Patrol! If she revealed herself, she would end up in incredible trouble and worse, the men certainly would not come back to search for Timber. He could be hurt, and was surely lost.
What would make him run away without waking me?
Maybe the fear of the dark was a real concern. More scared than ever, she worried herself with thoughts of Timber being injured, stolen, or devoured by an unknown beast.
The voices were coming closer.
Despite the threat of being truly lost, or being eaten herself, Solar ran away from the voices and into the darkness to find her beloved dog.

_____________________




__________

 

As an eager reader from an early age, much of Penni’s life was shaped by Bilbo’s exclamation that “he was going on an adventure!” Originally from Australia, Penni is now an avid storyteller and traveler (both physical and astral), currently located in Denver, Colorado. With a deep love of all things mystical, she also explores the energetic realm through her clairvoyance and channeling abilities.


Website: http://www.pennilouise.com

_________________________

GIVEAWAY!

Penni Louise is giving away 2  Kindle copies and 1 paperback copy of SEED OF TAMARIS!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • Three winners will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive either a Kindle or paperback copy
  • This giveaway ends midnight September 30.
  • Winner will be contacted via email on October 1.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.
Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!






Thursday, September 3, 2020

Book Watch: SURVIVING HIROSHIMA: A YOUNG WOMAN'S STORY by Anthony Drago & Douglas Wellman





SURVIVING HIROSHIMA
Anthony Drago & Douglas Wellman
Biography

From Russian nobility, the Palchikoffs barely escaped death at the hands of Bolshevik revolutionaries until Kaleria’s father, a White Russian officer, hijacked a ship to take them to safety in Hiroshima. Safety was short lived. Her father, a talented musician, established a new life for the family, but the outbreak of World War II created a cloud of suspicion that led to his imprisonment and years of deprivation for his family.

Then, on August 6, 1945, 22-year-old Kaleria was doing pre-breakfast chores when a blinding flash lit the sky over Hiroshima, Japan. A moment later, everything went black as the house collapsed on her and her family. Their world, and everyone else’s changed as the first atomic bomb was detonated over a city.

After the bombing, trapped in the center of previously unimagined devastation, Kaleria summoned her strength to come to the aid of bomb victims, treating the never-before seen effects of radiation. Fluent in English, Kaleria was soon recruited to work with General Douglas MacArthur’s occupation forces.







At 09 15:15am Tinian time - 08 15:15am Hiroshima time - the bomb drop sequence counts down to zero and Little Boy falls free from the bomb bay. Major Ferebee announces, “Bomb away,” but the everyone already knows that. Suddenly no longer struggling with its nearly 10,000 pound load, the Enola Gay has leaped upward, jolting the crew. Tibbetts immediately pulls the aircraft into a 155 degree right turn to put as much distance as possible between them and the blast site. They will have some time to make their escape. It will take Little Boy 44 seconds to fall to its designated detonation altitude of just under 2,000 feet.

In 44 seconds the future of warfare will be inalterably changed.

In 44 seconds tens of thousands of people will witness a horror never before seen.

In 44 seconds a 24-year-old Russian émigré, Kaleria Palchkoff, will be in the center of a horrendous conflagration never before unleashed in human history.










 


Anthony “Tony” Drago was born in Camden, New Jersey and spent much of his early childhood at his paternal grandparents Italian grocery store. From a young age, his mother, Kaleria Palchikoff Drago, would tell him the captivating story of her journey from Russia to Japan and then to the United States. It created Tony’s foundation for his love of history—especially his family’s history—bringing him to write this book.

After retiring in 2006, Tony doubled down on his passions—flying his airplane, restoring his classic car, and traveling the world with his wife, Kathy. Tony and Kathy have been married for forty-five years. They have three adult children and enjoy spending their days on the beach in their hometown of Carmel, California with their eight grandchildren and dogs, Tug and Maggie. For more information about Kaleria and the book, visit http://www.survivinghiroshima.com.




Douglas Wellman was a television producer-director for 35 years, as well as dean of the film school at the University of Southern California. He currently lives in Southern Utah with his wife, Deborah, where he works as a chaplain at a local hospital when he isn’t busy writing books.
For more information on Doug and the books he has written, visit his website at http://www.douglaswellmanauthor.com.








Book Watch: SURVIVING HIROSHIMA by Anthony Drago & Douglas Wellman




SURVIVING HIROSHIMA
Anthony Drago & Douglas Wellman
Biography

From Russian nobility, the Palchikoffs barely escaped death at the hands of Bolshevik revolutionaries until Kaleria’s father, a White Russian officer, hijacked a ship to take them to safety in Hiroshima. Safety was short lived. Her father, a talented musician, established a new life for the family, but the outbreak of World War II created a cloud of suspicion that led to his imprisonment and years of deprivation for his family.

Then, on August 6, 1945, 22-year-old Kaleria was doing pre-breakfast chores when a blinding flash lit the sky over Hiroshima, Japan. A moment later, everything went black as the house collapsed on her and her family. Their world, and everyone else’s changed as the first atomic bomb was detonated over a city.

After the bombing, trapped in the center of previously unimagined devastation, Kaleria summoned her strength to come to the aid of bomb victims, treating the never-before seen effects of radiation. Fluent in English, Kaleria was soon recruited to work with General Douglas MacArthur’s occupation forces.


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At 09 15:15am Tinian time - 08 15:15am Hiroshima time - the bomb drop sequence counts down to zero and Little Boy falls free from the bomb bay. Major Ferebee announces, “Bomb away,” but the everyone already knows that. Suddenly no longer struggling with its nearly 10,000 pound load, the Enola Gay has leaped upward, jolting the crew. Tibbetts immediately pulls the aircraft into a 155 degree right turn to put as much distance as possible between them and the blast site. They will have some time to make their escape. It will take Little Boy 44 seconds to fall to its designated detonation altitude of just under 2,000 feet.

In 44 seconds the future of warfare will be inalterably changed.

In 44 seconds tens of thousands of people will witness a horror never before seen.

In 44 seconds a 24-year-old Russian émigré, Kaleria Palchkoff, will be in the center of a horrendous conflagration never before unleashed in human history.


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Anthony “Tony” Drago was born in Camden, New Jersey and spent much of his early childhood at his paternal grandparents Italian grocery store. From a young age, his mother, Kaleria Palchikoff Drago, would tell him the captivating story of her journey from Russia to Japan and then to the United States. It created Tony’s foundation for his love of history—especially his family’s history—bringing him to write this book.

After retiring in 2006, Tony doubled down on his passions—flying his airplane, restoring his classic car, and traveling the world with his wife, Kathy. Tony and Kathy have been married for forty-five years. They have three adult children and enjoy spending their days on the beach in their hometown of Carmel, California with their eight grandchildren and dogs, Tug and Maggie. For more information about Kaleria and the book, visit http://www.survivinghiroshima.com.




Douglas Wellman was a television producer-director for 35 years, as well as dean of the film school at the University of Southern California. He currently lives in Southern Utah with his wife, Deborah, where he works as a chaplain at a local hospital when he isn’t busy writing books.
For more information on Doug and the books he has written, visit his website at http://www.douglaswellmanauthor.com.